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Glorious Coffee That's Good For You

My husband and I loves drinking coffee. In the morning, it is our bonding moment, to sip and eat bread and talk about our plans for the day. But recently, he was diagnosed to have Diabetes Type 2. So I abruptly cut his coffee from his system because he cannot take black coffee. He is really sad about it but I am trying to figure out how to incorporate coffee again in his system. For decades, coffee had received a bad reputation. Besides allegedly triggering high blood pressure, insomnia, and hyperacidity, the Filipino habit of adding lots of sugar and cream to one’s cup has been said to aggravate diabetes. While there’s no denying the Pinoy coffee fan his morning cup, there is concern over the amount of sugar present in commercial 3-in-1 coffee mixes. The leading brand has 14.6 grams of sugar in one 20-gram sachet alone. Imagine how much sugar you’re taking in if you drink an average of three cups of coffee a day. What About Sugar-Free Coffee? For health-conscious individuals, especial

How to Design a Cleaning Routine that Works with Your Schedule

Dishes, laundry, clutter—cleaning is a basic part of life that never ends. With a busy schedule, it can be hard to stay on top of it. A routine, however, builds cleaning into your schedule so that it becomes a habit. We’ve got the basics to help you get started. The number of people in your family, your work schedule, and the size of your home will all need to be factored into your cleaning routine. From there, it’s all about adjusting the routine to work within the unique demands of your life.

1. Create a List

You can’t manage everything until you know exactly what needs to be done. Create a list of all of your cleaning tasks. It might help to walk through each room while you’re doing this to make sure you remember everything. Some of the tasks will be daily while others will be weekly or monthly. You can put these tasks in separate columns according to their frequency or put a different symbol like a star or dot next to those that are a weekly or monthly need. 

2. Pick a Method but Know Yourself

There are any number of ways to create a routine, but only you know you. Are you the type of person who only succeeds if you fully commit yourself to a single project? Or are you better at chipping away at things a little bit at a time? Knowing yourself, your strengths and weaknesses can help you decide on a method that works for you long term. 

  • All or Nothing: With the all or nothing method, you schedule a block of time on one or two days a week to do all of your cleaning from start to finish. This method works well for small families and homes as it may only take an hour or two to wade through the clutter and leave the home sparkling clean. 
  • Piece by Piece: If overwhelm keeps you from cleaning, the piece by piece method might be a better fit. With this method, you regularly clean and pick up throughout the day. Every time you leave a room, put something away, wash and load dishes as soon as they’re used, and put away one set of toys before another is gotten out. However, you will need to set aside large chunks of time for deeper cleaning like cleaning out the refrigerator or washing windows. 
  • A Project a Day: With this method, you tackle one large cleaning project each day. Monday is bathrooms, Tuesday is the kitchen, Wednesday is the master bedroom, and so forth. You’ll be deep cleaning every day, but only in a specific area.
  • Timed Maintenance: Power cleaners thrive with this method in which you set a timer and get as much cleaning done as possible before the timer goes off. You can begin with a general cleaning plan before starting the timer or simply go where the clutter takes you.


No matter what method you choose to have the right tools available. A lightweight vacuum for small spills and touch-ups, a cleaning caddy to keep cleaning supplies organized, and disposable gloves if cleaning the bathroom makes you gag can make the process faster and more efficient. 

3. Chart It Out

Charts give you a quick visual break down. The chart should be organized by the week or month. It’s here that you can adjust the routine to your schedule. For example, on days you’re running kids to activities or participating in an after work yoga class, schedule fewer cleaning tasks. Be sure to share the work with everyone in the family and remember to add tasks that are monthly tasks only. 

Conclusion

A cleaning routine isn’t written in stone. It’s a starting point with the flexibility for the unexpected. Stick with it and you’ll be surprised how much easier it is to keep your home clean and clutter-free when you’ve got a plan. 

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